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20130104
20130112
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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
decided security would be an afghan responsibility in the aftermath of the fall of the taliban. i think that was a major mistake. the second was to allow the coalition we had successfully built for the war and for the peace conference to disintegrate. iran had been very helpful. week rebuffed offers of further help. pakistan had at least then not actively and helpful. but we failed to keep them up to that standard in the succeeding years. the third error which i failed to perceive was a failure to pursue reconciliation much earlier than we finally did. there were a certain proportion of the taliban leadership that were prepared to be cooperative, that would have collaborated. instead, we sent them to guantanamo, and sent a negative signal to those who might consider who being coopted into the new system. it took us almost a decade to reverse that policy. nevertheless, despite these problems, and despite the fact that now, more than 10 years on, we are still engaged in a counterinsurgency campaign in afghanistan, i think we have come a long way than many -- longer way than many of us rea
troops would weaken the negotiating position about those negotiations with the taliban ever got started again. now, the taliban, that's been one of their demands. all u.s. troops leave afghanistan after 2014. and there are some who feel the white house 234r0floated this io sort of, you know, lay the ground work to get some perhaps concessions on some other issues that are important to the white house. in other words, more of a negotiati negotiati negotiating ploy. >> it's been a tense relationship on many occasions. be interesting to know how this meeting goes in that regard. also he's the guy they have to deal with. he's the only player they really can deal with. but the reality is he still doesn't run much of afghanistan in the real world environment. and the lingering allegations of corruption, nepotism, hangs over his head. >> his brother and father were assassinated, so in some ways he's also trying to stay alive in that country. and facing that possibility, as well. it's been a contentious relationship with karzai over the years. he's had better relationships with some of the gene
to by the taliban. we will see a dramatic decrease of american dollars and soldiers being sent to afghanistan over the next several years. host: but you said earlier that aid will continue for at least 10 years. guest: i hope and expect that it will continue for the next 10 years. we should probably talk about where that is a good idea. the fact is, afghanistan and pakistan, that nexus, the tribal border region there that is poorly defined and poured a controlled is perhaps the most dangerous place in the world to the united states. it is where al qaeda and began. it is where the remnants of al qaeda still exists. there was a drone strike reported within the last 24 hours against terrorists in that region. that is an area that will remain a threat for the foreseeable future. we can conduct drones strikes, gather intelligence, continue to keep an eye on that area, stabilize it and influence the direction it goes, because that is the part of the world that puts the united states most at risk. host: a sovereignty issue for pakistan, but also, karzai is expected to bring up sovereignty issues for afgh
priorities backwards. if taliban takes control again in afghanistan, we won't have to worry about protecting drone bases or diplomats because we won't be there at all. and i think this is part of the unreality of the obama administration's approach there. the low troop numbers that they're contemplating, that they will be discussing with president karzai will not be any where near sufficient to accomplish our strategic objective, america's strategic objective which is defeating the taliban. and i think we're --. bill: it is fascinating. i apologize for the interruption how the events in benghazi are now shaping our foreign policy whether this administration wants to admit it or not. >> well that perhaps is the small glimmer of good news that they recognize that benghazi was a real debacle for our security policies for embassies overseas but the larger question here in afghanistan is the administration's unwillingness to do what we need to do to prevent 10 years of sacrifice and loss of life by our forces from simply being wasted if the taliban come back into power. bill: well this administra
, continuing to provide advisorses. in other words, give them the tools to fight the taliban. i think that in fact they're going to be motivated, partly because the taliban are going to behave so badly like they did before that we will find afghans win to fight them. it might not necessarily be president karzai, but there will be afghan actors who will fight the taliban. >>brian: you say one of the things the soviets did wrong, the soviet union collapsed, gorbachev takes over, and the reason why what the afghans left collapsed is because the soviets cut them off. >> gorbachev continued to arm them. it was yeltsin. as soon as yeltsin took over at our behest, he took overt marxist regime and within months it fell. >>brian: you look at egypt and iraq, you've been to iraq when saddam was in power in afghanistan, and you say wait, when we pull out, they'll realize we are best friend they could possibly have. >> i think what they're going to find is their problems aren't over. in other words, they've got an awful lot of enemies in that part of the world. everyone hates each other more than
, of course, shattered when she was shot at point blank range in the head by taliban men last october. so really great to see these latest pictures of malala walking out of hospital, but these are just first steps along what is likely to be a very long road toward recovery. erin. >> i love that sweet little wave that she gave. >> our fifth story out front, mcdreamy verses the mermaid. he said he's now the proud owner of a small seattle-based coffee chain. starbucks, the coffee giant, came in with the mermaid logo. they said not so fast. who is the new owner of tully's coffee. the owner? patrick dempsey. it took this to get you on the show, but we're excited to have you. why did you want to do this? why buy a coffee chain? >> tully's is a beloved brand here. there's such a loyal following between the workers and customers that it just felt right and it came together in many ways quite easily. and it's really exciting to be a part of this movement, really. and it was a brand that needed to be preserved. there were 500 jobs at stake. and you know, it just felt right. and i'm really excited a
that border, clean out those safe havens from the taliban go, refuel and come back to fight again, and the third stool, the third leg of that stool is the karzai government. he's a corrupt and incompetent leader, has failed to motivate his people and hold his country today. bill: with regard to karzai does he want us to leave or does he think his country can survive without us there? >> the yes is does karzai think he can survive without us there. karzai, i think has an exit strategy planned. how long is he going to survive if this is country is torn apart in a multi-part tee civil war? will his military remain faithful to him in the light of pashtoon taliban coming in. his military is phaeupd of different tribes. will they stay loyal and be effective? i think the problem everybody for sees and you can see it coming, that when we leave afghanistan a lot of things will happen. our military leaves. our ability to protect the civilian population that we are leaving behind, including our own civilian ngo aid workers, and then the final thing is will they be able to hold that country t
back the taliban. but it was always clear that at some point, you know, whether it's 2014 or '15 or '16 that military's going to have to get smaller because the afghan government cannot afford to sustain it and other countries will not put enough money into afghanistan to keep numbers at that size. >> good to see you, chris lawrence. >>> a face-off erupting in china over freedom of the press. this is all happening in a place called guangzhou, a little more than 80 miles from hong kong. in a rare protest, chinese rallied outside the offices of the southern weekly newspaper. they were supporting the journalists who say that the government rewrote an editorial calling for politic real form and gave it a positive spin. a very positive spin. howard kurtz host of "reliable sources" and the washington bureau chief of "newsweek" and "the daily beast." a lot of people surprised that they wouldn't be censorship of something like this. this newspaper's had a bit of rope in the past to play with. why does this incident be a flash point? >> certainly has seemed to touch a nev, michael. the idea of a
... >>. >> jamie: welcome back. two homicide bombers striking southern afghanistan. five people died. taliban claiming responsibility. police in bangladesh clashing with protestors who are trying to enforce a strike today. that in response to a hike in fuel prices. about two dozen people were injured as police tried to break up the crowd with rubber bullets and tear gas. and jirad showing off his new passport. french actor leaving his homeland in protest against the new tax rates for millionaires. >> gregg: americans suffering from foreclosure crisis are going to have to wait a little longer for relief. house oversight committee are asking to delay a multibillion dollar settlement. joining us to talk about it is brenda buttner. it's a $10 billion deal, 14 banks, five of the largest who gets compensated and how? >> that is part of the issue. we know that $3.75 billion is supposed to be basically paid out in cash to many of people who went through foreclosures in 2009 and 2010. the balance is some sort of release for borrowers. but the regulators can't agree and they are worried that the money
reports a teenaged girl shot by the taliban has finally been released by the hospital. she was shot in the head while campaigning for better education for girls. she still needs more surgery but the doctors say she's making great progress. >>> the miami heard says a man is speaking out for the first time. he said gangsters threatened to behead him. he was leased just before christmas. >>> as survivors of the newtown massacre return to school, the news times says gabby giffords plans to meet with the families. her husband mark kelly plans to meet with the town's officials. >>> in the "new york post," a man who gave the finger to a cop can sue. the arrest was not lawful. the man's attorney calls it an important civil rights victory. unus >> announcer: this national weather report sponsored by subway restaurants. subway. build your better breakfast. >>> it is a story that has torn an ohio town apart. it involves high school football stars, allegations of rain and digital vigilante act. many believe it was not a crime. >>> and environmental groups accuse shell of going too far looking f
to be a resurgence and outbreak of violence in a place that's already plagued by it. the taliban this weekend vowed more of what it called war destruction if the u.s. leaves behind a residual force. that's a sobering reminder of the instability here, alex. >> i appreciate the breakdown of the numbers and what they would be doing. >>> the new headline this morning, the white house considering a broad gun control plan. i'm going to speak with civil rights activist reverend jesse jackson about it next. later nbc news presidential historian michael beschloss on whether the debt ceiling could be a legacy trap. mine was earned off vietnam in 1968. over the south pacific in 1943. i got mine in iraq, 2003. usaa auto insurance is often handed down from generation to generation. because it offers a superior level of protection, and because usaa's commitment to serve the military, veterans and their families is without equal. begin your legacy, get an auto insurance quote. usaa. we know what it means to serve. starts with arthritis pain and a choice. take tylenol or take aleve, the #1 recommended pain relieve
around in afghanistan when they were hunting the taliban. >> right. >> will you just give us an insight on the problems that we face getting rid of, you know, these magazine clips where you can, you know, shoot off, you know, dozens of bullets in seconds? and some of these assault weapons that, again, are made for one reason and one reason only, to kill as many human beings as quickly as possible. talk about the challenges. because i know there are 40 democrats in the house that are going to fight getting rid of assault weapons. of course, most of the republicans are going to fight it. what's the great challenge there? >> i think that you're right, joe, and general mcchrystal was right, these are weapons of war. they are not weapons that you go hunting with or really that you can protect yourself with. you know, there is going to be a discussion. you know, starting today, we're going to hear it from governor cuomo. the vice president's having a series of meetings today. he's going to come out with a series of proposals very soon. assault weapons will most likely be part of that. we had
, that the afghan forces will not hang on to, sell it to, or have it capturedded from them by the taliban, and is it being a risk that what mite up in the hands of the haqqani network or potentially al al-qaa related groups? >> well, the defense secretary gave some information to the house in november about plans on this. he said the intense is to extract all equipment whose value to the arms forces is an extraction and recooperation. reallily, that is, you would expect that to include or have sophisticated equipment, but if we hope we do the southern route, pakistan, but we are negotiating northern rotes in kazakhstan and russia, but we can also bring equipment out by air, and as things stand now r there are no firm plans to leave equipment behind. there is no decisions to leave behind equipment x in afghanistan. if we do that, all relevant issues have to be looked at, but i think we should. if left to the afghan courses, we regard it in the same way. >> will export lines have to be issued for goods that are gifted, and will there be a need of approval for any such equipment? >> there's
of the taliban or some al qaeda believe the group's? >> the defense secretary give some information to the house and did in november about our plans on this. he told the house our intention is to respect all the equipment is the lead to the armed forces is greater than the cost of extraction. and recuperation. you would expect that to include woodall sophisticated -- inc lude with all sophisticated equipment. the can -- we can also bring some equipment out by air. there are no plans currently to leave any equipment behind. if we do that, all the relevant issues will have to be looked at -- but we will be regarded the and the the same way. >> will export licenses have to be issued? will there be a need for parliamentary approval be? >> every opportunity -- >> the equipment from the uk requires an export license. if the gift is above a certain by a, they are called in advance -- certain value, they are called in advance. >> i think it will be revisiting this issue. >> i'm sure. >> coming now to argentina. >> the cake government introduce restrictions -- the uk government introduced restrictions. i
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)